#SaveYourSkin

Better skin protection for you and your loved ones
Check, protect and play safe in the sun

Download the
ABCDE method

Skin cancer
preventing is curing

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One in three diagnosed cancers is a skin cancer. Worldwide, between two and three million non-melanocytic skin cancers and 132,000 malignant melanomas are diagnosed each year1. In the United States, one in five Americans will suffer from skin cancer in their lifetime2 while in Europe, skin cancer is rising by 5 to 7% a year3. However, the earlier it is detected the greater the chances of it being cured. Indeed, 90% of skin cancers are curable if treated in time.

1-2 http://www.who.int/uv/faq/skincancer/fr/index1.html
3 http://www.ligue-cancer.net/sites/default/files/brochures/cancers-peau.pdf

SKIN CANCER:
WHY NOT ASSESS YOUR RISK?

Several factors can determine your risk of developing skin cancer:

  • 1You have skin type I or II, your skin tans very little or not at all or you often get sunburnt.
  • 2You have freckles or moles that differ in appearance (size, shape, colour).
  • 3You got severe sunburns when you were a child or were frequently exposed to strong sunlight during your childhood or adolescence.
  • 4There is a history of skin cancer in your family.
  • 5You have a lot of moles, including some that are large, irregularly shaped or uneven in colour.

La Roche-Posay Laboratory has developed a simple and effective online test called "Am I a person at risk?" to assess your risk level.

Evaluate your personal risk level


ABCDE Method

by Professor Giuseppe Argenziano, MD, President of the International Dermoscopy Society

Early detection and
self-examination

by Professor Giuseppe Argenziano, MD, President of the International Dermoscopy Society

THIS is the ABCDE
dermatological method.

Use it to check your beauty spots and those of your loved ones.

It's good to have a close look, it's even better with the right tool!

In general, a person has around twenty moles distributed across their body and face, but the more they have, the greater their chances of developing skin cancer. According to the latest research, 65% of melanomas appear outside of a pre-existing mole.
It is therefore essential to be aware of and monitor the appearance of new moles and any changes that may occur.

To monitor any changes in your moles, use the ABCDE method that has been developed, approved and used by dermatologists the world over. Each letter corresponds to an aspect of moles that you should pay attention to:

DETECTED ON TIME, 90% OF SKIN CANCERS ARE CURABLE IF DETECTED IN TIME*

Now it's up to you to become a skinchecker!

But nothing replaces a diagnosis by a dermatologist. Don't hesitate to book your appointment!

*Source : www.euromelanoma.org/intl/node/25 epidemiological fact sheet.

  • as ASYMMETRY
  • as BORDERS
  • as COLOR
  • as DIAMETER
  • as EVOLUTION

NOTHING REPLACES
DIAGNOSIS BY A DERMATOLOGIST

If you are a person at risk, if you have noticed a new, suspicious lesion on your skin or a mole that has dramatically changed in appearance over the last few weeks, if you have never shown all of your skin to a doctor for a preventive skin check or if you have never seen a dermatologist, we strongly recommend that you visit a dermatologist for a comprehensive and preventive skin check.

Don't forget that the earlier skin cancer is diagnosed, the greater the chances are that it can be treated. And between dermatologists' visits, feel free to check out myskincheck.org to keep an eye on your moles!

Step-by-Step

Self-Examination

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Face
Examine your face, especially the nose, lips, mouth, and ears – front and back. Use mirrors to get a clear view.
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Scalp
Inspect your scalp, using a blow dryer and mirror to expose each section to view. Get a friend or family member, even a child, to help, if it is possible.
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Hands
Check your hands: palms and backs, between the fingers and under the fingernails.
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Arms
Standing in front of the full-length mirror, begin at the elbows and scan all sides of your upper arms. Examine both front and back of your forearms.
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Torso
Look to the neck and chest. Women should lift the breasts to see beneath.
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Back
With your back to a full-length mirror, use the hand mirror to inspect the back of your neck, shoulders, upper back, and any part of the back of your upper arms.
Still using mirrors don't forget your lower back, buttocks, and backs of both legs.
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Other areas
Sit down; prop each leg in turn on the other chair. Use the hand mirror to examine the genitals. Check front and sides of both legs, thigh to shin, ankles, tops of feet, between toes and under toenails. Examine soles of feet and heels.